2011 Conference

2011: Working Summits

The 2011 Octagon Conference brought practitioners, educators, researchers and inventors together with a goal of informing a discussion about the need for and characteristics of new models of subluxation. The 2011 Octagon concluded with the following consensus statements being generated by the participants:

Preamble

The participants of the Conference on Contemporary Scientific Paradigms and a Model for the Concept of Subluxation in Chiropractic expressed the importance of the context in which the following consensus statements were developed and the manner in which they would be applied. It was agreed that the model should be informed, but not constrained, by the history and traditions of the profession. Further it was agreed that any model developed from this effort should consider the legal and regulatory environment within which the term subluxation is commonly used. An appropriate model would need to apply to various practice settings, clinical goals and patient needs. Finally, it was agreed that the model should reflect that the concept of subluxation is important to but not synonymous with the term chiropractic.

The conferees agreed:

A contemporary model for the conceptualization of subluxation within chiropractic:

  1. Was needed
  2. Should reflect a broad conceptual perspective capable of embracing physical, emotional and mind-body relationships
  3. Should integrate, at a minimum, elements of biomechanics and neurophysiology using the best data available
  4. Should be open and flexible allowing for the inclusion of new data and new explanations

And, it was further  agreed that the model must reflect the following:

  1. A logical and rationale framework
  2. All elements of the model must be supported by the best evidence available
  3. The inclusion of linear and non-linear biological behaviors
  4. Acknowledgement of the gap between established evidence and the clinical outcomes experienced in practice
  5. Desired patient outcomes, active patient involvement in care, patient preferences in care, the impact of the patient-provider relationship and how it informs and affects the model
  6. Extends the consideration to the impact on the human experience

With this framework as a guide the LifeSource Octagon will envision, staff and conduct a series of workshops designed to address the various elements of the statements above and to extend the output of the Octagon into more finite and clearly understood outcomes.

The discussions of April 2011 are being carried forward in three workshops throughout the remainder of 2011 and on into 2012. The goal is for a final report to be issued by the Octagon no later than June 30, 2012.

The first of the continuation workshops will be completed before the end of 2011 and will involve the participation of Drs. Edward Cremata, Deed Harrison, Robert Leach, Dan Murphy, Rob Scott and Malik Slosberg. Additional invitations for participations have been extended but participation has not been confirmed at this time. The second round workshops are being planned at this time. The workshop participation is expected to be confirmed by November 1, 2011.

Among the goals of these two workshops will be to put into operation the agreements reached in April 2011 with respect to the characteristics of the models and to recommend dissemination for feedback on the models. The final workshop of the three will involve the construction, writing and distribution of the final report.

Conference Consensus Statements

The following was drafted in response to discussions and developments during the 2011 Octagon conference, and approved by voice vote by the conference faculty present on the last morning of the conference.

 

April 14-16, 2011 marked the presentation of the third in a series of annual conferences presented by the Life Octagon of Life University. True to the reason for its existence, to stage world changing discussions, the Octagon’s 2011 focus on Contemporary Scientific Paradigms brought key thought leaders in human potential, epigenetics and human performance, neurophysiology, psychology, clinical imaging, biomechanics and health policy together. Their goal was to inform a new model of subluxation for the chiropractic profession.

The 2011 Octagon emphasis was envisioned by Life University’s president Dr. Guy Riekeman and was put into operation by program planners Stephen Bolles, D.C. and Gerard W. Clum, D.C. in cooperation with a distinguished faculty involving researchers and clinicians, chiropractors and non-chiropractors, medical doctors and psychologists. Stimulating presentations, lively panel discussions, interesting audience participation and a framework for future dialogue flowed from the 2011 Octagon experience enjoyed by hundreds of attendee-observers.

The interdisciplinary nature of the convocation and the compelling need of the chiropractic profession for a broader and more inclusive approach to the concept of the subluxation gave rise to many thought provoking ideas. The opportunity for face-to-face dialogue with such a far-ranging spectrum of perspectives, from biomechanical to quantum mechanics, being brought together to address this area also served to break down misconceptions and preconceptions related to the discussion.

The most tangible product generated by the conference was the framework for future dialogue on the subject. The framework statements received total consensus from the conferees and are being carried forward as a directive for the further development of Contemporary Scientific Paradigms related to the concept of subluxation.

The following preamble to consensus statements was developed to help position the discussion and its outcomes within and beyond the chiropractic community.

Preamble

The participants of the Conference on Contemporary Scientific Paradigms and a model for the concept of subluxation in chiropractic expressed the importance of the context in which the following consensus statements were developed and the manner in which they would be applied. It was universally agreed that the model should be informed, but not constrained, by the history and traditions of the profession. Further it was agreed that any model developed from this effort should consider the legal and regulatory environment within which the term subluxation is commonly used. An appropriate model would need to apply to various practice settings, clinical goals and patient needs. Finally, it was agreed that the model should reflect that the concept of subluxation is important to but not synonymous with the term chiropractic.

Specifically the conferees agreed unanimously to the following statements:

A contemporary model for the conceptualization of subluxation within the chiropractic:

  1. Was needed
  2. Should reflect a broad conceptual perspective capable of embracing physical, emotional and mind-body relationships
  3. Should integrate, at a minimum, elements of biomechanics and neurophysiology using the best data available
  4. Should be open and flexible allowing for the inclusion of new data and new explanations

And, it was further unanimously agreed that the model must reflect the following elements:

  1. A logical and rationale framework
  2. All elements of the model must be supported by the best evidence available
  3. The inclusion of linear and non-linear behaviors
  4. Acknowledgement of the gap between established evidence and the clinical outcomes experienced in practice
  5. Desired patient outcomes, active patient involvement in care, patient preferences in care, the impact of the patient-provider relationship and how it informs and affects the model
  6. Extends the consideration to the impact on the human experience in general

With this framework as a guide the Life Source Octagon will envision, staff and conduct a series of workshops designed to address the various elements of the statements above and to extend the output of the Octagon into more finite and clearly understood outcomes.

 

In conclusion President Riekeman and the 2011 Life Source Octagon organizers would like to thank the following faculty for their participation, their generosity of information and their collegial engagement:

Ted Carrick, D.C., Ph.D.

Raymond Damadian, M.D.

Joe DiSpenza, D.C.

Christine Goertz, D.C., Ph.D.

Heidi Haarvik, D.C. Ph.D.

Bruce Lipton, Ph.D.

Scott Rosa, D.C.

Jay Triano, D.C., Ph.D.

Videos from the 2011 Conference

Welcoming Remarks. Dr. Guy Riekeman and Dr. Gerry Clum
Welcoming Remarks. Dr. Bruce Lipton

What are the stakes? A consideration of paradigms and subluxation models Dr. Gerry Clum
Vitalism and Reductionism, Outside In: A mechanistic view of spinal lesions Dr. Jay Triano

Weaving Different Elements Together: Developing a paradigm that accounts for mechanistic and non-mechanistic phenomena Drs. Clum and Scott
The Return of Vitalism (segment of the evening presentation on ‘Epigenetics, Environment, Subluxation: Elements of a New Paradigm’) Dr. Bruce Lipton


Thursday Evening Closing Comments Dr. Gerry Clum
Understanding Research Efforts and Subluxation Dr. Christine Goertz
and Dr. Heidi Haavik


How Large Does A Paradigm Have to Be? A question of
consciousness and integration. Moderated discussion with Drs. Clum, Koch, Scott, Haavik and Triano



Weaving Together the Different Elements. Dr. Rob Scott

An Inventory of Professional Activities. Drs. Clum, Dehen, Goertz
and Triano

Consciousness, Neurology and Structure. Dr. Ted Carrick

Summary, Next Steps and Wrapup. Drs. Riekeman, Bolles and Clum
 

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